Gee Mail

All that stuff that the grandparents forward….


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THE DAYS OF BLACK AND WHITE

THE DAYS OF BLACK AND WHITE

"Good night and God bless.."
Go all the way to the bottom past the pictures. I think you’ll enjoy it. Whoever wrote this must have been my next door neighbor because it totally described my childhood to a ‘T.’ Hope you enjoy it.

Black and White

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Black and White (Under age 40? You won’t understand.)

You could hardly see the TV picture for all the snow, spread the rabbit ears as far as they go.

Pull a chair up to the TV set,

‘Good Night, David.

Good Night, Chet.’

My Mom used to cut chicken, chop eggs and spread Mayo on the same cutting board with the same knife and no bleach, but we didn’t seem to get food poisoning.

My Mom used to defrost hamburger on the counter and I used to eat it raw sometimes, too. Our school sandwiches were wrapped in wax paper in a brown paper bag, not in ice pack coolers, but I can’t remember getting e.coli.

Almost all of us would have rather gone swimming in the lake instead of a pristine pool (talk about boring), no beach closures then.

The term cell phone would have conjured up a phone in a jail cell, and a pager was the school PA system.

We all took gym, not PE…and risked permanent injury with a pair of high top Ked’s (only worn in gym) instead of having cross-training athletic shoes with air cushion soles and built in light reflectors. I can’t recall any injuries but they must have happened because they tell us how much safer we are now.

Flunking gym was not an option.. Even for stupid kids! I guess PE must be much harder than gym.

Speaking of school, we all said prayers and sang the national anthem, and staying in detention after school caught all sorts of negative attention.

We must have had horribly damaged psyches. What an archaic health system we had then. Remember school nurses?
Ours wore a hat and everything.

I thought that I was supposed to accomplish something before I was allowed to be proud of myself.

I just can’t recall how bored we were without computers, Play Station, Nintendo, X-box or 270 digital TV cable stations.

Oh yeah… And where was the Benadryl and sterilization kit when I got that bee sting? I could have been killed!

We played ‘king of the hill’ on piles of gravel left on vacant construction sites, and when we got hurt, Mom pulled out the 48-cent bottle of mercurochrome (kids liked it better because it didn’t sting like iodine did) and then we got our butt spanked.

Now it’s a trip to the emergency room, followed by a 10-day dose of a $49 bottle of antibiotics, and then Mom calls the attorney to sue the contractor for leaving a horribly vicious pile of gravel where it was such a threat.

We didn’t act up at the neighbor’s house either, because if we did we got our butt spanked there and then we got our butt spanked again when we got home.

I recall Donny Reynolds from next door coming over and doing his tricks on the front stoop, just before he fell off.

Little did his Mom know that she could have owned our house.

Instead, she picked him up and swatted him for being such a goof. It was a neighborhood run amuck.

To top it off, not a single person I knew had ever been told that they were from a dysfunctional family.

How could we possibly have known that?

We needed to get into group therapy and anger management classes.

We were obviously so duped by so many societal ills, that we didn’t even notice that the entire country wasn’t taking Prozac!

How did we ever survive?

LOVE TO ALL OF US WHO SHARED THIS ERA. AND TO ALL WHO DIDN’T, SORRY FOR WHAT YOU MISSED.
I WOULDN’T TRADE IT FOR ANYTHING!

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A Pastor with GUTS

A Pastor with GUTS!

Thought you might enjoy this interesting

prayer given in Kansas at

the opening session of their Senate. It seems

prayer still upsets some

people.. When Minister Joe Wright was asked to open

the new session of the Kansas Senate, everyone was expecting the usualgeneralities, but this is what they heard:

Heavenly Father, we come before you today to ask

your forgiveness and to seek your direction and

guidance. We know Your Word says, ‘Woe to those

who call evil good,’ but that is exactly what we

have done.

We have lost our spiritual equilibrium and reversed

our values.

We have exploited the poor and called it

the lottery.

We have rewarded laziness and called it

welfare..

We have killed our unborn and called it

choice.

We have shot abortionists and called it

justifiable.

We have neglected to discipline our

children and called it building self esteem….

We have abused power and called it

politics.

We have coveted our neighbor’s possessions

and called it ambition.

We have polluted the air with profanity and

pornography and called it freedom of expression.

We have ridiculed the time-honored values

of our forefathers and called it enlightenment.

Search us, Oh, God, and know our hearts

today; cleanse us from every sin and set us free.

Amen!

The response was immediate. A number of

legislators walked out during the prayer in

protest. In 6 short weeks, Central Christian

Church, where Rev. Wright is pastor, logged more than

5,000 phone calls with only 47 of those calls

responding negatively. The church is now receiving

international requests for copies of this prayer

from India , Africa and Korea .

Commentator Paul Harvey aired this prayer on

his radio program, ‘The Rest of the Story,’and

received a larger response to this program than any

other he has ever aired.

With the Lord’s help, may this prayer sweep

over our nation and wholeheartedly become our

desire so that we again can be called ‘one nation

under God.’


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What goes around comes around

Notes for Unknown Wife Of William:

Good Ol’ Days Not So Great!

Life was not as romantic as we may picture it.

Here are some examples:

Most people married young, often at the age of 11 or 12, probably often because they were orphaned and had to marry or otherwise become wards of the Court of Wards, which would take all their property. Anne Hathaway married William Shakespeare when she was 26, unusually old for the times. Anne Hathaway’s home was a 3 bedroom house with a small parlor, which was seldom used(only for company), kitchen, and no bathroom.

Her mother and father shared a bedroom. Anne had a queen sized bed, but did not sleep alone. She also had two sisters and they shared the bed with six servant girls(this is before she married). They didn’t sleep length-wise like we do, but all laid on the bed cross-wise. At least they had a bed. The other bedroom was shared by her 6 brothers and 30 field workers. They didn’t have a bed. Everyone just wrapped up in their blanket and slept on the floor. So, they had 27 people living in their house. They had no indoor heating, so all the extra bodies kept them warm.

They were also small people, the men only grew to be about 5’6" and the women averaged about 4’8". Most people got married in June. Why? They took their yearly bath in May, so they were still smelling pretty good by June, although they were starting to smell, so the brides would carry a bouquet of flowers to hide their b.o. Their bath was in a big tub that they would fill with hot water. The man of the house would get the privilege of the nice clean water. Then all the other sons and men, then the women and finally the children. Last were the babies. By then the water was pretty thick. Thus, the saying, "don’t throw the baby out with the bath water," it was so dirty you could actually lose someone in it.

Some aspects of their houses left something to be disired. You’ve heard of thatch roofs. Well, that’s all they were. Thick straw, piled high, with no wood underneath. They were the only place for the little animals to get warm. So all the pets; dogs, cats and other small animals, mice, rats, bugs, all lived in the roof. When it rained it became slippery so sometimes the animals would slip and fall off the roof. Thus the saying, "it’s raining cats and dogs."

Since there was nothing to stop things from falling into the house they would just try to clean up a lot. But this posed a real problem in the bedroom where bugs and other droppings from animals could really mess up your nice clean bed, so they found if they would make beds with big posts and hang a sheet over the top it would prevent that problem. That’s where those beautiful big 4 poster beds with canopies came from.

When you came into the house you would notice most times that the floor was dirt. Only the wealthy had something other than dirt, that’s where the saying "dirt poor" came from. The wealthy would have slate floors. That was fine but in the winter they would get slippery when they got wet. So they started to spread thresh on the floor to help keep their footing. As the winter wore on they would just keep adding it and adding it until when you opened the door it would all start slipping outside. So they put a piece of wood at the entry way, a "thresh hold".

In the kitchen they would cook over the fire; they had a fireplace in the kitchen/parlor, that was seldom used and sometimes in the master bedroom. They had a big kettle that always hung over the fire and every day they would light the fire and start adding things to the pot. Mostly they ate vegetables, they didn’t get much meat. They would eat the stew for dinner then leave the leftovers in the pot to get cold overnight and then start over the next day. Sometimes the stew would have food in it that had been in there for a month! Thus the rhyme: "Peas porridge hot, peas porridge cold, peas porridge in the pot nine days old."

Sometimes they could get a hold of some pork. They really felt special when that happened and when company came over they even had a rack in the parlor where they would bring out some bacon and hang it to show it off. That was a sign of wealth and that a man "could really bring home the bacon." They would cut off a little to share with guests and they would all sit around and "chew the fat."

If you had money your plates were made out of pewter. Sometimes some of their food had a high acid content and some of the lead would leach out into the food. They really noticed it happened with tomatoes. So they stopped eating tomatoes, for 400 years. Most people didn’t have pewter plates though, they all had trenchers, that was a piece of wood with the middle scooped out like a bowl. They never washed their boards and a lot of times worms would get into the wood. After eating off the trencher with worms they would get "trench mouth."

If you were going traveling and wanted to stay at an Inn they usually provided the bed but not the board. The bread was divided according to status. The workers would get the burnt bottom of the loaf, the family would get the middle and guests would get the top, or the "upper crust".

They also had lead cups, and when they would drink their ale or whiskey, the combination would sometimes knock them out for a couple of days. They would be walking along the road and here would be someone knocked out and they thought they were dead. So they would pick them up and take them home and get them ready to bury. They realized if they were too slow about it, the person would wake up; also, maybe not. So they would lay them out on the kitchen table for a couple of days, the family would gather around and eat and drink and wait and see if they would wake up. That’s where the custom of holding a "wake" came from.

Since England is so old and small they started running out of places to bury people. So they started digging up some coffins and would take their bones to a house and re-use the grave. They started opening these coffins and found some had scratch marks on the inside. One out of 25 coffins were that way and they realized they had still been burying people alive. So they thought they would tie a string on their wrist and lead it through the coffin and up through the ground and tie it to a bell. Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all night to listen for the bell. That is how the saying "graveyard shift" was made. If the bell would ring they would know that someone was "saved by the bell" or he was a "dead ringer".

In English pubs, ale is ordered by pints and quarts. So in old England, when customers got unruly, the bartender would yell at them to mind their own pints and quarts and settle down. It’s where we get the phrase "mind your P’s and Q’s." In old England, containers for liquids such as beer were made of leather coated with pitch, hence the name "pitcher."

After consuming a bucket or two of vibrant brew they called aul, or ale, the Vikings would head fearlessly into battle often without armor or even shirts. In fact, the term "berserk" means "bare shirt" in Norse, who invaded and settled northern England, and eventually took on the English meaning of their wild battles.

In 1740, Admiral Vernon of the British fleet decided to water down the Navy’s rum. Needless to say, the sailors weren’t too pleased and called Admiral Vernon, Old Grog, after the stiff wool grogram coats he wore. The term "grog" soon began to mean the watered down drink itself. When you were drunk on this grog, you were "groggy", a word still in use today.

Many years ago in England, pub frequenters had a whistle baked into the rim or handle of their ceramic cups. When they needed a refill, they used the whistle to get some service. "Wet your whistle," is the phrase inspired by this practice.

Other interesting origins of English words:

In Baltimore, in the mid 1800’s there was a man who sold corpses to the hospital for research. He stored the cadavers in cheap whiskey to ferment them before turning them over to the researchers. He then sold the whiskey to the medical students…thus the term "rot gut."

It was the accepted practice in Babylonia 4,000 years ago that for a month after the wedding, the bride’s father would supply his son-in-law with all the mead he could drink. Mead is a honey beer, and because their calendar was lunar based, this period was called the "honey month" or what we know today as the "honeymoon." Before thermometers were invented, brewers would dip a thumb or finger into the mix to find the right temperature for adding yeast. Too cold, and the yeast wouldn’t grow. Too hot, and the yeast would die. This thumb in the beer is where we get the phrase "rule of thumb."

Courtesy of Mary Lou Iverson


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Blonde Cookbook

It’s fun to cook for Tom. Today I made angel food cake. The recipe said beat 12 eggs separately. The neighbors were nice enough to loan me some extra bowls.

Tom wanted fruit salad for supper. The recipe said serve without dressing. So I didn’t dress. What a surprise when Tom brought a friend home for supper.

A good day for rice. The recipe said wash thoroughly before steaming the rice. It seemed kind of silly, but I took a bath anyway. I can’t say it improved the rice any.

Today Tom asked for salad again, so I tried a new recipe. It said prepare ingredients; lay on a bed of lettuce one hour before serving. Tom asked me why I was rolling around in the garden..

I found an easy recipe for cookies. It said put the ingredients in a bowl and beat it. There must have been something wrong with this recipe. When I got back, everything was the same as when I left.


Saturday Tom did the shopping today and brought home a chicken. He asked me to dress it for Sunday. I don’t have any clothes that fit it, and for some reason Tom keeps counting to ten.

Tom’s folks came to dinner. I wanted to serve roast, but all I had was hamburger. Suddenly I had a flash of genius. I put the hamburger in the oven and set the controls for roast. It still came out hamburger, much to my disappointment.
GOOD NIGHT DEAR DIARY. This has been a very exciting week! I am eager for tomorrow to come, so I can try out a new recipe on Tom. If I can talk Tom into buying a bigger oven, I would like to surprise him with a chocolate moose.


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1906 film!

This is well worth viewing and filmed just 4 days before the 1906 San Francisco earthquake.

You’ll appreciate the research that it took to date this film so be sure to read this first…..

Here’s a neat opportunity to enjoy some time-travel. The film is from a streetcar traveling down Market Street in San Francisco , four days before the big earthquake/fire that destroyed the area. You can clearly see the clock tower at the end of the street at the Embarcadero wharf that’s still there… The quality & detail is great, so be sure to view it full screen.

The film was originally thought to be from 1905 until David Kiehn with the Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum figured out exactly when it was shot. From New York trade papers ann ouncing the film showing, to the wet streets from recent heavy rainfall and shadows indicating the time of year & actual weather and conditions on historical record, even when the cars were registered (he even knows who owned them and when the plates were issued!), the film could be correctly dated.

It was filmed only four days before the quake and shipped by train to New York for processing. Amazing but true!

According to Wikipedia, traffic signal lights were not invented until 1912, and not common for some years later.

http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=NINOxRxze9k